Julius Caesar: A Roman aristocrat, general and politician Julius Caesar gained almost unlimited power from military victories. He had been made dictator before the play started, but he wanted to be made king so he could designate his heir. He is assassinated midway through the play, but his ghost appears later to Brutus.

Octavius Caesar: One of the triumvirs who rule following the death of Julius Caesar, Octavius, with Antony, leads the army that defeats Cassius and Brutus at Philippi.

Mark Antony: A young kinsman of Caesar, Mark Antony is fiercely loyal to him. A skilled orator who excites the mob at Caesar’s funeral, he is one of the triumvirs who rule after Caesar’s death.

M. Aemilius Lepidus: One of the triumvirs who rule following the death of Julius Caesar, Lepidus is weak and Antony uses him essentially to run errands.

Cicero: A senator

Publius: A senator

Popilius Lena: A senator

Marcus Brutus: A powerful orator and a well-known and powerful senator, Marcus Brutus is a close friend of Julius Caesar. He is convinced by the other conspirators to join their plot because they believe the future of Rome is at stake. After the assassination, he becomes one of the military leaders opposing the triumvirate, but, when he believes defeat is certain, he kills himself.

Cassius: Brother-in-law to Brutus, Cassius is a capable soldier and the leader of the conspirators. He, too, leads the opposing armies with Brutus and kills himself when he believes defeat is certain.

Casca: A conspirator, the first to stab Caesar

Trebonius: A conspirator

Caius Ligarius: A conspirator

Decius Brutus: A conspirator

Metellus Cimber: A conspirator

Cinna: A conspirator

Flavius: A tribune

Murellus: A tribune

Artemidorus of Cnidos: A teacher of rhetoric, Artemirdorus attempts to warn Caesar of the plot, but Caesar ignores him.

Soothsayer: Twice, the soothsayer warns Caesar of the Ides of March.

Cinna the Poet: Only because he has the same name as one of the conspirators, Cinna the Poet is murdered by the riotous mob intent on avenging Caesar’s death.

Another Poet

Lucilius: A friend of Brutus and Cassius

Titinius: A friend of Brutus and Cassius

Messala: A friend of Brutus and Cassius

Young Cato: A friend of Brutus and Cassius

Volumnius: A friend of Brutus and Cassius

Flavius: A friend of Brutus and Cassius

Varrus: A servant of Brutus

Clitus: A servant of Brutus

Claudio: A servant of Brutus

Strato: A servant of Brutus

Lucius: A servant of Brutus

Dardanius: A servant of Brutus

Pindarus: A servant of Cassius

Calphurnia: Julius Caesar’s wife, Calphurnia unsuccessfully urges her husband to stay at home on the day of the assassination because of the many nightmares and bad omens she has experienced during the previous night.

Portia: Brutus’s wife, Portia is loyal to her husband, but she commits suicide by “swallowing fire” when she realizes that her husband’s fortunes are doomed.