Affined: Bound, obligated.
“I in any just term am affined  / To love the Moor.”
      — Iago (1.1.40)

Agnize: Recognize, acknowledge.
“I do agnize / A natural and prompt alacrity.”
        — Othello (1.3.231)

Anthropophagi: Cannibals.
“The Anthropophagi.
        — Othello (1.3.144)

Antres: A cavern.
“Wherein of antres vast.”
        — Othello (1.3.140)

Aleppo: An ancient city of Syria.
“That in Allepo once.”
        — Othello (5.2.352)

Arithmetician: An expert in arithmetic.
“A great arithmetician.”
        — Iago (1.1.19)

Arrivance: Arrival.
“Every minute is expectancy / Of more arrivance.”
        — Gentleman (2.1.42)

Aspics: Asps, snakes.
“For ’tis of aspics’ tougues!”
        — Othello (3.3.450)

Assay: Analysis or trial.
“By no assay of reason.”
        — Senator (1.3.18)

Avaunt: Hence, away
 Avaunt! Be gone!”
        — Othello (3.3.335)

Barbary: The coastal region of north Africa, known as a pirate stronghold.
“A Barbary horse.”
        — Iago (1.1.111)

Billeted: Lodging for a soldier.
“Go where thou art billeted.”
        — Iago (2.3.380)

Bombast: Inflated language or speech. 
“With a bombast circumstance.”
        — Iago (1.1.13)

Callet: A whore or beggar woman.
“[He] laid such terms upon his callet.” 
        — Emilia (4.2.121)

Cashier’d: Dismissed, returned.
“When he’s old, cashier’d.
        —Iago (1.1.48)

Caitiff: Cowardly, despicable person.
“Alas poor caitiff!”
        — Cassio (4.1.108)

Crusadoes: Portuguese silver or gold coins.
“I had rather lost my purse full of crusadoes.”
        — Desdemona (3.4.26)

Daws: A jackdaw, bird.
“For daws to peck at.”
        — Iago (1.1.66)

Dilatory: Causing to delay or procrastinate.
“Wit depends on dilatory time.”
        — Iago (2.3.373)

Devesting: To take away, or remove the clothing.
 Devesting them for bed.”
        — Iago (2.3.181)

Exsufflicate: Empty, frivolous.
“To such exsufflicate and blown surmises.”
        — Othello (3.3.182)

Grange: A farm and its surroundings.
“My house is not a grange.”
        — Barbantio (1.1.106)

Halter: A noose or gallows.
“A halter pardon him!”
        — Emilia (4.2.136)

Horologe: A sundial or an early form of clock.
“He’ll watch the horologe.”
        — Iago (2.3.130)

Indign: Unworthy or disgraceful.
“All indign and base adversities.”
        — Othello (1.3.273)

Jesses: A leash like strap used in falconry.
“Her jesses were my dear heartstrings.”
        — Othello (3.3.261)

Mandragora: The root of the mandrake plant had soporific and narcotic properties.
“Not poppy, nor mandragora.”
        — Iago (3.3.330)

Mazzard: Head.
“I’ll knock you o’er the mazzard.”
        — Cassio (2.3.155)

Mutualities: Exchanges, reciprocities.
“When these mutualities so marshal.”
        — Iago (2.1.260)

Pate: Top of the head.
“My invention / Comes from my pate.”
        — Iago (2.1.126)

Pith: Strength or force.
“Since these arms of mine had seven years’ pith.”
        — Othello (1.3.83)

Pliant: Flexible (here used to mean free time).
“Took once a pliant hour.”
        — Othello (1.3.151)

Potting: Liquor, drinking.
    “They are most potent in potting.”
        — Iago (2.3.77)

Procreants: Procreators, lovers.
“Leave procreants alone.”
        — Othello (4.2.28)

Quillets: Subtlety, nicety, quibble.
“Keep up thy quillets.”
        — Cassio (3.1.23)

Sagittary: The arsenal of Venice, called so because of the figure of Sagittarius
        over the door.
“Lead to the Sagittary.”
        — Iago (1.1.158)

’Sblood: Exclamation, God’s Blood
 ’Sblood, but you will not hear me.”
        — Iago (1.1.4)